Current and upcoming:

More-Than-One-And-Less-Than-Two - Gordilloscudder
On view until 8 June

The Florida Prize in Contemporary Art - Orlando Museum of Art
5 Jun - 31 Aug

In a Perfect World (II)


Ziggurat, 2013
Acrylic mirror, bricks, aluminum, wooden pallet



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Ziggurat, 2013
Acrylic mirror, bricks, aluminum, wooden pallet
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In a Perfect World, 2013 (Installation view)
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall

The following is excerpted from the catalog statement.

Besides the four objects that make up In a Perfect World, there is another object which is physically nowhere, yet occupies each of the sculptures. This form, used by Buckminster Fuller in his first Dymaxion Maps, divides a sphere by four great circles into equally sided triangles and squares. Each of the physical sculptures in the group is composed of bowed fiberglass rods that pass through holes cut in mirrors, and each is entirely unique with regard to the shapes, angles and numbers of these components. Yet as the fiberglass rods reflect around in the mirrors, all create this same virtual spherical structure. The rods bow with tension as they pierce their mirrors. They have a sense of sustained action, a charge of potential energy. The virtual sphere’s entire structure is composed of reflections of this charged material, imbuing it with an explosive quality, an outward force bound by its material.

Seeming to float like a nucleus within the recurring sphere is another virtual shape that is different in each sculpture. This form arises from and echoes each unique composition of mirrors. These nuclei are caused by a hole in the end of each sculpture that presses against the gallery wall. The isolated architecture seen through the hole becomes perceptually dislocated, combining with reflected images to form a geometric mass that seems to float disembodied from the surrounding wall.

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In a Perfect World, 2013 (Installation view)
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
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Download pdf exhibition essays:
In a Perfect World, by Brookhart Jonquil
Mirror Images, by Katherine Pill


In a Perfect World (III), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
7ft 8in x 7ft 8in x 2ft 2in

The following is excerpted from the catalog statement.

Besides the four objects that make up In a Perfect World, there is another object which is physically nowhere, yet occupies each of the sculptures. This form, used by Buckminster Fuller in his first Dymaxion Maps, divides a sphere by four great circles into equally sided triangles and squares. Each of the physical sculptures in the group is composed of bowed fiberglass rods that pass through holes cut in mirrors, and each is entirely unique with regard to the shapes, angles and numbers of these components. Yet as the fiberglass rods reflect around in the mirrors, all create this same virtual spherical structure. The rods bow with tension as they pierce their mirrors. They have a sense of sustained action, a charge of potential energy. The virtual sphere’s entire structure is composed of reflections of this charged material, imbuing it with an explosive quality, an outward force bound by its material.

Seeming to float like a nucleus within the recurring sphere is another virtual shape that is different in each sculpture. This form arises from and echoes each unique composition of mirrors. These nuclei are caused by a hole in the end of each sculpture that presses against the gallery wall. The isolated architecture seen through the hole becomes perceptually dislocated, combining with reflected images to form a geometric mass that seems to float disembodied from the surrounding wall.

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In a Perfect World (III), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
7ft 8in x 7ft 8in x 2ft 2in
Show Information


In a Perfect World (II), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
7ft 3in x 5ft 1in x 3ft

The following is excerpted from the catalog statement.

Besides the four objects that make up In a Perfect World, there is another object which is physically nowhere, yet occupies each of the sculptures. This form, used by Buckminster Fuller in his first Dymaxion Maps, divides a sphere by four great circles into equally sided triangles and squares. Each of the physical sculptures in the group is composed of bowed fiberglass rods that pass through holes cut in mirrors, and each is entirely unique with regard to the shapes, angles and numbers of these components. Yet as the fiberglass rods reflect around in the mirrors, all create this same virtual spherical structure. The rods bow with tension as they pierce their mirrors. They have a sense of sustained action, a charge of potential energy. The virtual sphere’s entire structure is composed of reflections of this charged material, imbuing it with an explosive quality, an outward force bound by its material.

Seeming to float like a nucleus within the recurring sphere is another virtual shape that is different in each sculpture. This form arises from and echoes each unique composition of mirrors. These nuclei are caused by a hole in the end of each sculpture that presses against the gallery wall. The isolated architecture seen through the hole becomes perceptually dislocated, combining with reflected images to form a geometric mass that seems to float disembodied from the surrounding wall.

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In a Perfect World (II), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
7ft 3in x 5ft 1in x 3ft
Show Information


In a Perfect World (II), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
7ft 3in x 5ft 1in x 3ft

The following is excerpted from the catalog statement.

Besides the four objects that make up In a Perfect World, there is another object which is physically nowhere, yet occupies each of the sculptures. This form, used by Buckminster Fuller in his first Dymaxion Maps, divides a sphere by four great circles into equally sided triangles and squares. Each of the physical sculptures in the group is composed of bowed fiberglass rods that pass through holes cut in mirrors, and each is entirely unique with regard to the shapes, angles and numbers of these components. Yet as the fiberglass rods reflect around in the mirrors, all create this same virtual spherical structure. The rods bow with tension as they pierce their mirrors. They have a sense of sustained action, a charge of potential energy. The virtual sphere’s entire structure is composed of reflections of this charged material, imbuing it with an explosive quality, an outward force bound by its material.

Seeming to float like a nucleus within the recurring sphere is another virtual shape that is different in each sculpture. This form arises from and echoes each unique composition of mirrors. These nuclei are caused by a hole in the end of each sculpture that presses against the gallery wall. The isolated architecture seen through the hole becomes perceptually dislocated, combining with reflected images to form a geometric mass that seems to float disembodied from the surrounding wall.

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In a Perfect World (II), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
7ft 3in x 5ft 1in x 3ft
Show Information


In a Perfect World (I), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
4ft 9in x 5ft 2in x 3ft 8in

The following is excerpted from the catalog statement.

Besides the four objects that make up In a Perfect World, there is another object which is physically nowhere, yet occupies each of the sculptures. This form, used by Buckminster Fuller in his first Dymaxion Maps, divides a sphere by four great circles into equally sided triangles and squares. Each of the physical sculptures in the group is composed of bowed fiberglass rods that pass through holes cut in mirrors, and each is entirely unique with regard to the shapes, angles and numbers of these components. Yet as the fiberglass rods reflect around in the mirrors, all create this same virtual spherical structure. The rods bow with tension as they pierce their mirrors. They have a sense of sustained action, a charge of potential energy. The virtual sphere’s entire structure is composed of reflections of this charged material, imbuing it with an explosive quality, an outward force bound by its material.

Seeming to float like a nucleus within the recurring sphere is another virtual shape that is different in each sculpture. This form arises from and echoes each unique composition of mirrors. These nuclei are caused by a hole in the end of each sculpture that presses against the gallery wall. The isolated architecture seen through the hole becomes perceptually dislocated, combining with reflected images to form a geometric mass that seems to float disembodied from the surrounding wall.

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In a Perfect World (I), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
4ft 9in x 5ft 2in x 3ft 8in
Show Information


In a Perfect World (IIII), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
8ft 7in x 8ft 7in x 2ft 2in

The following is excerpted from the catalog statement.

Besides the four objects that make up In a Perfect World, there is another object which is physically nowhere, yet occupies each of the sculptures. This form, used by Buckminster Fuller in his first Dymaxion Maps, divides a sphere by four great circles into equally sided triangles and squares. Each of the physical sculptures in the group is composed of bowed fiberglass rods that pass through holes cut in mirrors, and each is entirely unique with regard to the shapes, angles and numbers of these components. Yet as the fiberglass rods reflect around in the mirrors, all create this same virtual spherical structure. The rods bow with tension as they pierce their mirrors. They have a sense of sustained action, a charge of potential energy. The virtual sphere’s entire structure is composed of reflections of this charged material, imbuing it with an explosive quality, an outward force bound by its material.

Seeming to float like a nucleus within the recurring sphere is another virtual shape that is different in each sculpture. This form arises from and echoes each unique composition of mirrors. These nuclei are caused by a hole in the end of each sculpture that presses against the gallery wall. The isolated architecture seen through the hole becomes perceptually dislocated, combining with reflected images to form a geometric mass that seems to float disembodied from the surrounding wall.

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In a Perfect World (IIII), 2013
Mirror, fiberglass, plywood, steel, wall
8ft 7in x 8ft 7in x 2ft 2in
Show Information


Void for Burning, 2013
Nitrocellulose (to be burned by the collector, leaves no ash)
approx. 2ft x 2ft x 3in

This paper-like material is nitrocellulose, an unstable material that when ignited burns quickly, brightly, and completely, leaving nothing behind, not even ash. The intention of the piece is for the collector to take it home, and when they are ready, to burn it. The object transforms into a void. And yet in many ways it was already a void to begin with, the veil has just been removed. If the collector cannot bring themself to burn it, the instability of the material will cause it to eventually dissolve into a powder or a goo.

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Void for Burning, 2013
Nitrocellulose (to be burned by the collector, leaves no ash)
approx. 2ft x 2ft x 3in
Show Information


Voids for Burning, 2013
Nitrocellulose (to be burned by the collector, leaves no ash)
approx. 2ft x 2ft x 3in each

This paper-like material is nitrocellulose, an unstable material that when ignited burns quickly, brightly, and completely, leaving nothing behind, not even ash. The intention of the piece is for the collector to take it home, and when they are ready, to burn it. The object transforms into a void. And yet in many ways it was already a void to begin with, the veil has just been removed. If the collector cannot bring themself to burn it, the instability of the material will cause it to eventually dissolve into a powder or a goo.

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Voids for Burning, 2013
Nitrocellulose (to be burned by the collector, leaves no ash)
approx. 2ft x 2ft x 3in each
Show Information


Collider, 2013
Acrylic mirror, MDF, borax crystals 50in x 19in x 17in

Borax crystals, grown into two geometric shapes, reflected in precisely positioned mirrors to create the perception of solid three dimensional forms. The mirrors used to create the forms intersect each other, creating a dynamic sense of chaos.

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Collider, 2013
Acrylic mirror, MDF, borax crystals
50in x 19in x 17in
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Orpheus and Eurydice, 2012
In Collaboration with Yara Travieso and Chat Travieso
Lumber, hardware, satellite dish, continuous performance of aria from Monteverdi's L'Orfeo
Dimensions variable

Two towers personify Orpheus and Eurydice of greek myth, a live opera performer sings from Monteverdi's L'Orfeo with his back to the audience, as Orpheus's back was turned to Eurydice's as they ascended from the underworld. A Satellite dish carries his voice to the audience across a distance, resulting in a surprisingly intimate experience.

Orpheus and Eurydice, 2012
In Collaboration with Yara Travieso and Chat Travieso
Lumber, hardware, satellite dish, continuous performance of aria from Monteverdi's L'Orfeo
Dimensions variable
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From Inverted Night, 2012
Installed in de la Cruz Collection Project Space
)E)A)R)T)H): Mirrors, EPS, MDF, plaster, paint
5ft x 5ft x 5ft
Inverted Night: Acrylic on retro-reflective vinyl, led floodlights
12ft x 15ft x variable depth

Inverted Nightis an installation comprised of two elements: a sculpture and a painting.
Five mirrors intersect a globe, holding it up and giving the appearance of weightlessness. As each section combines with its own reflections, the viewer perceives five unique abstractions of the Earth. The mirrors do not trick the viewer, there remains a clear understanding of what is present physically, but the gestalt images are unshakably real. Where the globe meets the mirrors, the Yves Klein Blue continents form symmetrical patterns like Rorschach blots. Again, there is a dual awareness- the viewer recognizes the political map, but simultaneously interprets an image that reveals something private and subconscious.
The painting element is a large brightly illuminated surface of retro-reflective vinyl. The field sublimates into light, evoking limitless space, while scattered black stars become voids within a blinding night sky. The constellations depict the sky as it was at the moment of the painting's creation, cataloging a time and place. Blurring the distinction between painting and installation, the space of the painting extends forward to the bank of flood lights that illuminates it, occupying the entire room.

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E)A)R)T)H), 2012
From Inverted Night, installed in de la Cruz Collection Project Space
Sculpture: E)A)R)T)H), Mirrors, EPS, MDF, plaster, paint
5ft x 5ft x 5ft
Painting: Inverted Night, Acrylic on retro-reflective vinyl, led floodlights
12ft x 15ft x variable depth
Show Information


From Inverted Night, 2012
Installed in de la Cruz Collection Project Space
)E)A)R)T)H): Mirrors, EPS, MDF, plaster, paint
5ft x 5ft x 5ft
Inverted Night: Acrylic on retro-reflective vinyl, led floodlights
12ft x 15ft x variable depth

Inverted Nightis an installation comprised of two elements: a sculpture and a painting.
In E)A)R)T)H), five mirrors intersect a globe, holding it up and giving the appearance of weightlessness. As each section combines with its own reflections, the viewer perceives five unique abstractions of the Earth. There is a dual awareness- the viewer recognizes the political map, but simultaneously interprets Rorschach-like image that reveals something private and subconscious. The sculpture speaks to the disconnection and isolation of individuals as well as cultures, each the center of thier own world.
The painting element is a large brightly illuminated surface of retro-reflective vinyl. The field sublimates into light, evoking limitless space, while scattered black stars become voids within a blinding night sky. The constellations depict the sky as it was at the moment of the painting's creation, cataloging a time and place. Blurring the distinction between painting and installation, the space of the painting extends forward to the bank of flood lights that illuminates it, occupying the entire room.

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E)A)R)T)H), 2012
From Inverted Night, installed in de la Cruz Collection Project Space
Sculpture: E)A)R)T)H), Mirrors, EPS, MDF, plaster, paint
5ft x 5ft x 5ft
Painting: Inverted Night, Acrylic on retro-reflective vinyl, led floodlights
12ft x 15ft x variable depth
Show Information


Lumber Icosahedron, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, lumber, custom hardware
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft

Lumber Icosahedron is from a series of "Light Objects"- in which mundane materials such as lumber or illuminated fluorescent tubes pass through precisely cut holes in structures made of acrylic mirror. In each piece, the angles of the mirrors and of the intersecting objects cause the reflections to form specific geometric arrangements. These reflections created in the mirrors are not simply multiplications of the object, rather, the images in the mirrors combine with the physical material to create a single composition, a sculpture that is a hybrid of the physical and the immaterial. There is no optical illusion in these works, the viewer is never fooled, while the geometric shapes have a very real presence in the perception of the viewer, the physical objects equally maintain their reality as mundane objects. This creates a double-awareness, a resolved paradox in which the thing that is and the thing that isn't coexist.

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Lumber Icosahedron, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, lumber, custom hardware
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft
Show Information


Lumber Icosahedron, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, lumber, custom hardware
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft

Lumber Icosahedron is from a series of "Light Objects"- in which mundane materials such as lumber or illuminated fluorescent tubes pass through precisely cut holes in structures made of acrylic mirror. In each piece, the angles of the mirrors and of the intersecting objects cause the reflections to form specific geometric arrangements. These reflections created in the mirrors are not simply multiplications of the object, rather, the images in the mirrors combine with the physical material to create a single composition, a sculpture that is a hybrid of the physical and the immaterial. There is no optical illusion in these works, the viewer is never fooled, while the geometric shapes have a very real presence in the perception of the viewer, the physical objects equally maintain their reality as mundane objects. This creates a double-awareness, a resolved paradox in which the thing that is and the thing that isn't coexist.

Download High Resolution Image

Lumber Icosahedron, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, lumber, custom hardware
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft
Show Information


Installation view at PULSE Miami, 2011
From left to right: Lumber Icosahedron, Hexagonal Light, Squared Squares, Equilateral Object

Lumber Icosahedron is from a series of "Light Objects"- in which mundane materials such as lumber or illuminated fluorescent tubes pass through precisely cut holes in structures made of acrylic mirror. In each piece, the angles of the mirrors and of the intersecting objects cause the reflections to form specific geometric arrangements. These reflections created in the mirrors are not simply multiplications of the object, rather, the images in the mirrors combine with the physical material to create a single composition, a sculpture that is a hybrid of the physical and the immaterial. There is no optical illusion in these works, the viewer is never fooled, while the geometric shapes have a very real presence in the perception of the viewer, the physical objects equally maintain their reality as mundane objects. This creates a double-awareness, a resolved paradox in which the thing that is and the thing that isn't coexist.

Download High Resolution Image

Installation view at PULSE Miami, 2011
From left to right: Lumber Icosahedron, Hexagonal Light, Squared Squares, Equilateral Object
Show Information


Light Objects, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, aluminum, fluorescent tube with ballast and wires
From left to right: Hexagonal Light, Squared Squares, Equilateral Object

In the series "Light Objects" mundane materials such as lumber or illuminated fluorescent tubes pass through precisely cut holes in structures made of acrylic mirror. In each piece, the angles of the mirrors and of the intersecting objects cause the reflections to form specific geometric arrangements. These reflections created in the mirrors are not simply multiplications of the object, rather, the images in the mirrors combine with the physical material to create a single composition, a sculpture that is a hybrid of the physical and the immaterial. The fluorescent tubes are themselves dematerialized by the bright light the emit, they are both glass objects and lines of light. There is no optical illusion in these works, the viewer is never fooled, while the geometric shapes have a very real presence in the perception of the viewer, the physical objects equally maintain their reality as mundane objects. This creates a double-awareness, a resolved paradox in which the thing that is and the thing that isn't coexist.

Download High Resolution Image

Light Objects, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, aluminum, fluorescent tube with ballast and wires
From left to right: Hexagonal Light, Squared Squares, Equilateral Object
Show Information


Light Objects, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, aluminum, fluorescent tube with ballast and wires
From left to right: Hexagonal Light, Squared Squares, Equilateral Object

In the series "Light Objects" mundane materials such as lumber or illuminated fluorescent tubes pass through precisely cut holes in structures made of acrylic mirror. In each piece, the angles of the mirrors and of the intersecting objects cause the reflections to form specific geometric arrangements. These reflections created in the mirrors are not simply multiplications of the object, rather, the images in the mirrors combine with the physical material to create a single composition, a sculpture that is a hybrid of the physical and the immaterial. The fluorescent tubes are themselves dematerialized by the bright light the emit, they are both glass objects and lines of light. There is no optical illusion in these works, the viewer is never fooled, while the geometric shapes have a very real presence in the perception of the viewer, the physical objects equally maintain their reality as mundane objects. This creates a double-awareness, a resolved paradox in which the thing that is and the thing that isn't coexist.

Download High Resolution Image

Light Objects, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, aluminum, fluorescent tube with ballast and wires
From left to right: Hexagonal Light, Squared Squares, Equilateral Object
Show Information


Hexagonal Object, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, aluminum, fluorescent tube with ballast and wires
4ft x 1ft x 2ft 6in, wires variable

Hexagonal Object is from a series of "Light Objects"- in which mundane materials such as lumber or illuminated fluorescent tubes pass through precisely cut holes in structures made of acrylic mirror. In each piece, the angles of the mirrors and of the intersecting objects cause the reflections to form specific geometric arrangements. These reflections created in the mirrors are not simply multiplications of the object, rather, the images in the mirrors combine with the physical material to create a single composition, a sculpture that is a hybrid of the physical and the immaterial. The fluorescent tubes are themselves dematerialized by the bright light the emit, they are both glass objects and lines of light. There is no optical illusion in these works, the viewer is never fooled, while the geometric shapes have a very real presence in the perception of the viewer, the physical objects equally maintain their reality as mundane objects. This creates a double-awareness, a resolved paradox in which the thing that is and the thing that isn't coexist.

Download High Resolution Image

Hexagonal Object, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, aluminum, fluorescent tube with ballast and wires
4ft x 1ft x 2ft 6in, wires variable
Show Information


Building Pyramids, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, gold spray paint on floor
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft

The mirrors that make up Building Pyramids are placed at a precise angle relative to each other and to the floor, so that the way the floor tilts back in the reflection recreates the proportions of the three main pyramids in Giza. The floor, spray painted gold, retains its own material texture while distorting to create a new architectural form. The arced shape of the mirrors describe a sphere in their reflections, the circumference of each being equal to the base of each virtual pyramid, thereby "squaring the circle" as the Egyptian pyramids do. The placement of the objects on the floor also corresponds to their Giza counterparts, as does their orientation to the North.

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Building Pyramids, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, gold spray paint on floor
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft
Show Information


Building Pyramids, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, gold spray paint on floor
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft

The mirrors that make up Building Pyramids are placed at a precise angle relative to each other and to the floor, so that the way the floor tilts back in the reflection recreates the proportions of the three main pyramids in Giza. The floor, spray painted gold, retains its own material texture while distorting to create a new architectural form. The arced shape of the mirrors describe a sphere in their reflections, the circumference of each being equal to the base of each virtual pyramid, thereby "squaring the circle" as the Egyptian pyramids do. The placement of the objects on the floor also corresponds to their Giza counterparts, as does their orientation to the North.

Download High Resolution Image

Building Pyramids, 2011
Acrylic mirror, paint, gold spray paint on floor
7ft 6in x 8ft x 4ft
Show Information


Never Odd or Even, 2011
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
30ft x 30ft x 30ft

Installed at Dorsch Gallery in Miami.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

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Never Odd or Even, 2011
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
30ft x 30ft x 30ft
Show Information


Never Odd or Even, 2011
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
30ft x 30ft x 30ft

Installed at Dorsch Gallery in Miami.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

Download High Resolution Image

Never Odd or Even, 2011
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
30ft x 30ft x 30ft
Show Information


Biosphere Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 44in

The Displacement Prism series explores the dual nature of the photograph, a physical object, and a flat depiction of dimensional space. Using 3D modeling software, a virtual prism is placed within the digital photograph. The displacement of light occurs within the two-dimensional material of the image, not the photographed environment. The photograph is permanantly bonded to an acrylic sheet, an image embedded in a prism.

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Biosphere Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 44in
Show Information


Tropics Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 46in

The Displacement Prism series explores the dual nature of the photograph, a physical object, and a flat depiction of dimensional space. Using 3D modeling software, a virtual prism is placed within the digital photograph. The displacement of light occurs within the two-dimensional material of the image, not the photographed environment. The photograph is permanantly bonded to an acrylic sheet, an image embedded in a prism.

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Tropics Displacement Prism, 2012
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 46in
Show Information


Aroid House Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 44in

The Displacement Prism series explores the dual nature of the photograph, a physical object, and a flat depiction of dimensional space. Using 3D modeling software, a virtual prism is placed within the digital photograph. The displacement of light occurs within the two-dimensional material of the image, not the photographed environment. The photograph is permanantly bonded to an acrylic sheet, an image embedded in a prism.

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Aroid House Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 44in
Show Information


Fern Room Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 44in

The Displacement Prism series explores the dual nature of the photograph, a physical object, and a flat depiction of dimensional space. Using 3D modeling software, a virtual prism is placed within the digital photograph. The displacement of light occurs within the two-dimensional material of the image, not the photographed environment. The photograph is permanantly bonded to an acrylic sheet, an image embedded in a prism.

Download High Resolution Image

Fern Room Displacement Prism, 2011
Digitally altered photograph, sintra mounted archival inkjet print
30in x 44in
Show Information


Power Split, 2011
Altered light fixture, two electrical outlets
Dimensions Variable

Power Split consists of a common work-light, the electrical cord to which has been sliced along its length. The plug, divided into two parts, is inserted into two separate electrical outlets. This simple gesture defies the architectural structure, creating a new circuit that bridges and vividly activates the space between the outlets. It seems to break the rules, and restores to electricity a kind of elemental vitality. The piece responds in dramatically different ways to changes in its configuration- it can bridge outlets across a wall, across a room, even between two separate buildings, a configuration that challenges not only architectural structures, but economic structures and the abstract concept of energy ownership.

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Power Split, 2011
Altered light fixture, two electrical outlets
Dimensions Variable
Show Information


Power Split, 2011
Altered light fixture, two electrical outlets
Dimensions Variable

Power Split consists of a common work-light, the electrical cord to which has been sliced along its length. The plug, divided into two parts, is inserted into two separate electrical outlets. This simple gesture defies the architectural structure, creating a new circuit that bridges and vividly activates the space between the outlets. It seems to break the rules, and restores to electricity a kind of elemental vitality. The piece responds in dramatically different ways to changes in its configuration- it can bridge outlets across a wall, across a room, even between two separate buildings, a configuration that challenges not only architectural structures, but economic structures and the abstract concept of energy ownership.

Download High Resolution Image

Power Split, 2011
Altered light fixture, two electrical outlets
Dimensions Variable
Show Information


Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft

Installed at Sullivan Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

Download High Resolution Image

Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft
Show Information


Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft

Installed at Sullivan Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

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Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft
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Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft

Installed at Sullivan Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

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Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft
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Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft

Installed at Sullivan Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

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Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft
Show Information


Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft

Installed at Sullivan Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago.
Never Odd or Even is a room-sized installation in which an anonymous looking work station- a table, a chair, painted lumber and a saw horse- are physically doubled across an imaginary plane, as though through a mirror. Some objects intersect with their doppelgangers, some are nearly lost, resulting in new forms that increasingly tend toward abstraction. For the viewer this creates a feeling of paradox, an uncertainty about reality. The viewer is not tricked, they are not fooled into thinking a mirror is present, yet when talking about the piece they invariably use the vocabulary of illusion to describe their experience- this object is a reflection of that object. Though both are simply objects, their existence becomes interdependent. The title, like the installation, is a palindrome, and is taken from an invented book that is pinned beneath one leg of the table, which in the upside-down room creates an absurd reversal of gravity.

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Never Odd or Even, 2010
Wood, steel, custom made books, ready-made objects, concrete, drywall
10ft x 10ft 11in x 11ft
Show Information


Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable

The viewer climbs a short ladder to look through two mirrors set at 90°. The mirrors split the vision: one eye sees a dart stuck in the wall, the other eye sees a drawing of the same. The mind interprets the two sources as a single reality, a thing existing as both an object and a drawing.

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Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable
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Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable

The viewer climbs a short ladder to look through two mirrors set at 90°. The mirrors split the vision: one eye sees a dart stuck in the wall, the other eye sees a drawing of the same. The mind interprets the two sources as a single reality, a thing existing as both an object and a drawing.

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Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable
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Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable

The viewer climbs a short ladder to look through two mirrors set at 90°. The mirrors split the vision: one eye sees a dart stuck in the wall, the other eye sees a drawing of the same. The mind interprets the two sources as a single reality, a thing existing as both an object and a drawing.

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Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable
Show Information


Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable

The viewer climbs a short ladder to look through two mirrors set at 90°. The mirrors split the vision: one eye sees a dart stuck in the wall, the other eye sees a drawing of the same. The mind interprets the two sources as a single reality, a thing existing as both an object and a drawing.

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Looking Both Ways, 2009
Mirrors, dart, steel, pencil drawing on wall
Dimensions variable
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Double Negative, 2009
Altered walls
Dimensions variable, space approx. 10ft x 10ft x 8ft

One wall has the word "negative" backward and protruding 1/4 of an inch, directly accross, on the opposite wall, the same word written forward is a mirror image, but is recessed 1/4 inch into the wall.

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Double Negative, 2009
Altered walls
Dimensions variable, space approx. 10ft x 10ft x 8ft
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ECNALUBMA, 2009
Mirrored acrylic letters inlayed in drywall
60in x 7.5in x 0in

Each letter is inlayed into the wall so that the piece occupies no space within the room. The word is placed a few feet above the floor, so that the reflection the viewer sees is their legs as they walk through the space.

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ECNALUBMA, 2009
Mirrored acrylic letters inlayed in drywall
60in x 7.5in x 0in
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ECNALUBMA, 2009
Mirrored acrylic letters inlayed in drywall
60in x 7.5in x 0in

Each letter is inlayed into the wall so that the piece occupies no space within the room. The word is placed a few feet above the floor, so that the reflection the viewer sees is their legs as they walk through the space.

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ECNALUBMA, 2009
Mirrored acrylic letters inlayed in drywall
60in x 7.5in x 0in
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Distance and Distortion, 2010
Metalized polyester film, fluorescent lights, steel
Dimensions Variable

Installed in a 25ft-high shaft that formerly was occupied by a fireman's pole. Two sheets of reflective film are streched from the floor to the ceiling at a slightly acute angle, causing a set of fluorescent tubes installed overhead to reflect infinitly into a huge arc. Due to the qualities of the thin film, as the reflections multiply out into the distance, they are increasingly distorted. The dynamic visual effect is similar to that of being under water.
Installed at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, AZ

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Distance and Distortion, 2010
Metalized polyester film, fluorescent lights, steel
Dimensions Variable
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Distance and Distortion, 2010
Metalized polyester film, fluorescent lights, steel
Dimensions Variable

Installed in a 25ft-high shaft that formerly was occupied by a fireman's pole. Two sheets of reflective film are streched from the floor to the ceiling at a slightly acute angle, causing a set of fluorescent tubes installed overhead to reflect infinitly into a huge arc. Due to the qualities of the thin film, as the reflections multiply out into the distance, they are increasingly distorted. The dynamic visual effect is similar to that of being under water.
Installed at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, AZ

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Distance and Distortion, 2010
Metalized polyester film, fluorescent lights, steel
Dimensions Variable
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Distance and Distortion, 2010
Metalized polyester film, fluorescent lights, steel
Dimensions Variable

Installed in a 25ft-high shaft that formerly was occupied by a fireman's pole. Two sheets of reflective film are streched from the floor to the ceiling at a slightly acute angle, causing a set of fluorescent tubes installed overhead to reflect infinitly into a huge arc. Due to the qualities of the thin film, as the reflections multiply out into the distance, they are increasingly distorted. The dynamic visual effect is similar to that of being under water.
Installed at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, AZ

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Distance and Distortion, 2010
Metalized polyester film, fluorescent lights, steel
Dimensions Variable
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Self Portrait, 2009
Graphite on board
22in x 15.5in

Pencil is drawn on the surface until the image is no longer depicted by the graphite, but reflected in it.

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Self Portrait, 2009
Graphite on board
22in x 15.5in
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Self Portrait, 2009
Graphite on board
22in x 15.5in

Pencil is drawn on the surface until the image is no longer depicted by the graphite, but reflected in it.

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Self Portrait, 2009
Graphite on board
22in x 15.5in
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Untitled (2-Page Essay Without Words), 2009
Two sheets of A4 acid free paper, crumpled
18in x 1ft x 5in

Crumpling a piece of paper has a unpredictability to it that makes it the index of the action that created it, to see that random crumple repeated creates a confusion that has to do with time, with the specificity of the moment. Has time repeated itself? or did this singular moment happen in multiple places?

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Untitled (2-Page Essay Without Words), 2009
Two sheets of A4 acid free paper, crumpled
18in x 1ft x 5in
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Untitled (2-Page Essay Without Words), 2009
Two sheets of A4 acid free paper, crumpled
18in x 1ft x 5in

Crumpling a piece of paper has a unpredictability to it that makes it the index of the action that created it, to see that random crumple repeated creates a confusion that has to do with time, with the specificity of the moment. Has time repeated itself? or did this singular moment happen in multiple places?

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Untitled (2-Page Essay Without Words), 2009
Two sheets of A4 acid free paper, crumpled
18in x 1ft x 5in
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Atmosphere, 2008
Ambient moisture, aluminum, freezing mechanism
12in x 30in x variable depth

An aluminum panal is set flush with the surface of the wall. Freezing mechanisms behind the panal cause ambient moisture to accumulate on the surface. The piece changes depending on the humidity and temperature of its environment, it may gather frost or drip away as conditions shift.

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Atmosphere, 2008
Ambient moisture, aluminum, freezing mechanism
12in x 30in x variable depth
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Atmosphere, 2008
Ambient moisture, aluminum, freezing mechanism
12in x 30in x variable depth

An aluminum panal is set flush with the surface of the wall. Freezing mechanisms behind the panal cause ambient moisture to accumulate on the surface. The piece changes depending on the humidity and temperature of its environment, it may gather frost or drip away as conditions shift.

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Atmosphere, 2008
Ambient moisture, aluminum, freezing mechanism
12in x 30in x variable depth
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Still Event, 2008
Soap bubble, wand, plexiglass, electrical components
10.5in x 8.5in x 5ft

A soap bubble is suspended indefinately in a climate controlled acrylic box.

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Still Event, 2008
Soap bubble, wand, plexiglass, electrical components
10.5in x 8.5in x 5ft
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